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  • George Farag

Understanding Trump's Immigration Pause

Updated: Apr 26

The American people have always welcomed #immigrants from all over the world. That will not change. But Americans and permanent residents have deep concerns at this time of the #coronavirus. It is an exceptional moment that requires exceptional action. Each nation has the obligation to protect the health and economic well-being of its people.


The New York Times painted at terrifying picture of the Coronavirus crisis in America. It reported on an “apocalyptic “ Coronavirus surge depleting hospitals, strained food supplies, and “eye-watering” unemployment.

Americans and permanent residents in the United States are concerned. President Trump response was to sign a presidential proclamation that puts a temporary pause on some new immigrants from coming to America.

There has been a lot of commotion about the proclamation. So let’s cut through all the noise to figure out what it exactly means.

First thing’s first. Trump did not ban or suspend all immigrants from coming to America when he signed the April 22 proclamation.

People who fall into one of the following immigration categories are not affected by the proclamation:
  • Already have a #greencard.

  • Are the spouse of an American citizen

  • Are a child of an American citizen who is under 21 years of age.

  • Are the spouse or child of someone in the U.S. military.

  • Are a physician, nurse, or other healthcare professional working to combat COVID-19.

  • Want to invest in the United States through the #EB5 program, which requires an investment of at least $900,000.

  • Qualify for certain types of special immigrant visas based on conditions placed by the Secretary of State

  • Are someone that the Secretary of State, Secretary of Homeland Security, or Attorney General considers to be in America’s national interest.

People who want to come to the United States temporarily are not affected. For example those who want to:

  • Apply for #H1B specialty workers, #H2A agriculture workers and other temporary work visas.

  • Come on tourism or temporary business.

Those who are already legally in the United States on an immigrant visa can still apply for a green card.

Those who already have a green card and qualify for naturalization can still apply to become an American citizen.

So if all these folks do not fall under the proclamation then who exactly is affected?


The following people cannot apply for a new immigrant visa while the proclamation is in effect:
  • Those who are outside the United States as of April 23 and don't fall into one of the categories above.

  • Those who don’t have a valid immigrant visa as of April 23.

  • Parents, children over 21 years, or siblings of an American citizen

  • Spouses or children of green card holders.

  • Those who want an employment based immigrant visa but don’t fall into one of the categories listed above.


People who are affected by the immigration pause will have to wait for 60 days from when the order was signed, or around June 23. After that they can resume their immigration process assuming the proclamation is not extended further.

The American people have always welcomed immigrants from all over the world. That will not change.


The American people have always welcomed immigrants from all over the world. My family and I were welcomed to America. That hospitality will not change. But Americans and permanent residents have deep concerns at this time of the coronavirus. It is an exceptional moment that requires exceptional action. Each nation has the obligation to protect the health and economic well-being of its people.

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